Good stewards of creation along the Coquille

May 10th, 2014

Photo by Tim Palmer

Photo by Tim Palmer

CAMP BOARD JOINS WITH WILD RIVERS LAND TRUST TO PROTECT FOREST

Camp Myrtlewood’s long awaited conservation easement slated for October, 2014!

In an exquisite combination of long-term visioning, serendipity, divine grace, and human generosity, Camp Myrtlewood and the Oregon/Washington District of the Church of the Brethren have signed a memo of understanding with the Wild Rivers Land Trust (a southwestern Oregon land conservancy) to establish a conservation easement on their camp’s land. The 2014 WRLT Conservation Plan designates the camp lands as being of “high ecological value.” “The healthy timber in this rich forested setting is an intact natural resource that provides habitat for numerous species. It provides connectivity for wildlife, and a buffer for BLM designated marbled Murrelet habitat (Critical Habitat per NW Forest Plan). Camp Myrtlewood’s creeks provide spawning and rearing habitat for Coho Salmon, Chinook Salmon, steelhead and wild Cutthroat Trout.” Conservation issues that the 140-acre easement will address are forest protection and potential future development. The conservation easement document is currently in process and is scheduled to be legally reviewed and in place by the end of October 2014—twenty years from the time of its conception.

Jerry Becker, Executive Director of WRLT, says “Being a good steward of the Creation is a worthy goal for each and every person. Good stewards look at the forest as a perennial polyculture to be carefully tended—not as a strip mine to be liquidated or a crop to be cashed in.” Long committed to a reverential respect for Creation, Camp Myrtlewood and their brothers and sisters in the OR/WA District are continuing to do what they can to practice good eco-stewardship.

About Wild Rivers Land Trust and Camp Myrtlewood’s Conservation Easement: WRLT helps safeguard a way-of-life that American’s cherish. Founded in 2000, the non-profit organization works with landowners choosing to voluntarily protect their working lands and the exceptional places that make Oregon’s Wild Rivers Coast unique. A conservation easement is a contractual agreement between a landowner and a land trust, which transfers certain property rights while the landowner retains title ownership. The easement is filed with the County Clerk and becomes a legal instrument that is attached to the property deed for perpetuity. While most neighboring land in the area has been heavily clear-cut in recent decades, acreage adjoining the camp features old-growth forest on federal Bureau of Land Management property and together with the camp offers a precious island of semi-wild nature that likely supports imperiled marbled murrelets.

An easement to spare this deep forest and its exquisite stream frontage from development or commercial logging will be a service to the entire region and its people.

Contact info: John Jones (541) 572-1067

Photo by Tim Palmer

Photo by Tim Palmer