June 27th – weekly land trust news

 


This beautiful shot of a summer sunset in the Columbia Gorge is courtesy of Friends of the Columbia Gorge and shows the stunning vistas one can experience by heading out and staying later into the evening.

COLT’s weekly land trust news

June 27th, 2016

Sunny Monday greetings everyone,

We’re almost a full week past the solstice and summer is officially underway!

This week, we have some refreshing changes within the land trust community: Columbia Land Trust revealed their first logo makeover in 25 years. Additionally, Blue Mountains Conservancy unveiled a new website design. More information in our Land Trust News section below.

In addition, some items carrying over from last week:

  • The Oregon Coastal Values survey by some researchers at PSU.
  • And for those who didn’t see it last week, a recent survey conducted by a Portland State University graduate student looks at landowner attitudes toward conservation easements in the Whychus Creek watershed. You can read more about the survey and Ashley Vizek’s work here on our website.

We hope you enjoy safe travels if applicable, and a safe holiday weekend!

Warmly,
Stephanie Manzo

Upcoming grants, deadlines, and events   

 

Southern Oregon Land Conservancy’s NCCC AmeriCorps team, national volunteers, finishing up some critical restoration work.

Oregon Land Trust News


Joe “Bring-yer-lenses” Moll of the McKenzie River Trust interviewed on KEZI TV in advance of their Living River Celebration this past weekend.

Blue Mountains Conservancy unveiled their new website this past week. Explore it in more detail here!
 

Columbia Land Trust updated their look after 25 years with a new logo design by Murmur Creative.
Read more about the process here!
 

Conservation job opportunities

See our website for the latest

Upcoming webinars and conferences

Other conservation news and information

 

Monarch flutterby in June. Photo: Stephanie Hazen / Special to the Statesman Journal


A new film about the Klamath-Siskiyou ecoregion explores why the region needs more conservation.

 

 

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